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February 2017 Update

February 14, 2017 Hawaii Rentals Comments Off on February 2017 Update

Aloha

In this edition:

1. Legislative Update – Three weeks into the Session;
2. Funding and Membership Drive;
3. New Regulations Effective January 1, 2016;
4. Specific regulations for each County

1. 2017 Legislative Session in now Open

We are three weeks into the legislative session and RBOAA has submitted testimony on over a dozen bills already. The Government Relations team has been working around the clock…if not literally, at least it feels like it!

We also got some great press from the Hawaii Free Press.

In the January update, we discussed how the 2016 session ended with Governor Ige vetoing the bill which would allow the advertising platforms to collect and remit taxes on behalf of the operators.

As you know, one of the main criticisms of vacation rentals, whether true or not, is that we do not collect and remit taxes. The hotel industry uses that argument across the nation to support increased regulation or the outright banning of vacation rentals. Last year, the bill had put forward by one of the advertising platforms in an attempt to crack down on tax cheats but also to stem the efforts of the hotel industry to shut us down.

This bill has resurfaced in 2017 with six different versions being presented.

Some versions of the bill were put forward by the hotel industry and included language which would limit transient vacation rentals to no more than 60 days of rentals per year and limit vacation rental owners to owning no more than one property.

There are about 10 bills which propose to increase taxes on us, including two which require an amendment to the State Constitution in order to allow the State to impose a new tax upon vacation rentals and residential investment properties.

We started with about 20 bills dealing with vacation rentals in four themes.

1. Advertising Platforms (such as VRBO) can collect and remit taxes on behalf of operators (you).
2. Travelers to Hawaii and people and companies who provide accommodation to the travelers should pay more in tax.
3. People who rent out residential property to vacationers should be limited to renting out no more than 60 nights per year and owning no more than one or two properties. (More on this below)
4. Counties should be allowed to change zoning to eliminate transient vacation rentals. This proposal comes up each year, but this year, it only applies to the County of Kauai.

Let’s focus on #3 first as the limitations on rentals are very concerning, obviously. Our initial understanding was that the restrictions were intended to apply to a small group of vacation rental owners. However, we later learned that the restrictions were intended to apply to every vacation rental except hotels, motels, inns and B&B’s. RBOAA vigorously opposed these bills. The bills were also opposed by the State Attorney General. The Senate committee rejected the bill on Friday afternoon and the House Committee removed the language limiting activity to one unit and to 60 days. So, put that in the win column!

Advertising Platforms as Tax Collection Agents

This remains a hot button issue. The legislators are determined to pass this bill and avoid a veto again this year. Our members are definitely split on this topic.

RBOAA is testifying on the bill and asking for amendments to improve it. We support the concept of easing both the tax collection burden and enforcement of compliance with county zoning regulations. Not only is that the right position to take, but it helps neutralize the primary criticism we face in the media and in the legislature. If our opponents (currently, it is the hotels) can’t say we don’t pay tax and we don’t comply with zoning, the legislators are far less incentivized to impose new regulations on us.

We are seeking the amendments to a) prevent the tax collection agent from charging us for collecting and remitting tax; b) allowing us to opt-out of the tax collection arrangement our advertising platform has (under certain circumstances); and c) require the state to conduct annual audits of the tax collection agents.

Taxes

As travelers don’t vote, they are a good source of tax revenue. There are a number of proposals to increase the TAT to cover education, environment and housing. There is also a proposal to add an additional tax on the property tax.

RBOAA will try to help the legislators understand that Hawaii needs to remain competitive in the tourism and convention market.

Here is a brief synopsis of the bills we are working on:

HB1470 – has passed to the second round of committees
This bill is one of many dealing with the question of hosting platforms as tax collection agents. It requires us, as operators, to keep records (putting the onus of audit on the operator). The bill provides for hosting platforms to de-list any advertiser (you) who does not comply with tax or zoning laws and requires the platforms to obtain attestation from you that you are in compliance with zoning laws.

This bill previously had the language to limit us to 60 days rental per year and limit us to owning only one property and provided for a 4% increase in the TAT. That language is all gone, but this bill remains deeply flawed and RBOAA will be opposing it vigorously until it is defeated.

HB 1471 / SB1087 – both versions have passed to the second round of committees
These bills allow anyone, not just hosting platforms, to act as tax collection agents. This bill is not offensive but it needs to be a lot better in order to be good legislation. RBOAA is strongly pushing for improvements and amendments to the bill as noted above.
We expect these bills will pass. There is very strong support at the Capitol for them.

SB1281 / SB1202 – both bills were deferred (rejected) in first round of committee

HB1242 – has not been heard in committee and is not likely to be heard
These three bills were similar in concept to HB1471 and SB 1087.

HB546 – rejected in the first round of committee
This bill proposed surtax on the TAT in order to fund housing for hotel employees.

HB180 / HB 182 / SB 686 / SB 683 – all passed to the second round of committees
These bills increase property taxes on both vacation rentals and residential investment properties to help fund the education system in Hawaii. Two bills increase the tax and two bills provide for the amendment to the Hawaii State Constitution to make the new tax legal.

Property Value Surcharge per $1000 of property value
Under $500,000 $3.50
$500,000- $750,000 $4.50
$750,000-$1,000,000 $5.50
$1,000,000 – $2,000,000 $6.50
$2,000,000 and over $7.50

So, if your property was worth $400,000, you would pay $1400 in residential property tax surcharge each year. If your property was worth $2,000,000, you would pay $15,000.

In addition, there is proposed a nightly tax of $3.00 for rents up to $150 per night and $5.00 per night for rents over $150. This is regardless of occupancy. So the $400,000 property probably commands a rent of $150 a night on average, so 365*$5 = $1825, for a total tax of $3225.

Currently, this type of tax is most likely not possible to implement in Hawaii, so they are proposing a constitutional amendment (SB683 & HB182) to allow the state to impose this tax. This is the same tax which has been the subject of a legal battle in the City and County of Honolulu.

The Counties are not in favor of this bill, nor is the State Department of Finance. However, the bills have garnered massive support for parents, teachers’ unions, schools and social agencies.
RBOAA is opposing the bills, but we expect this battle to be hard-fought.

SB862 / HB1331 – SB862 has passed to the next round of committees and HB1331 has not yet been heard.
These identical bills allow for the phase out of single family transient vacation rental units in the counties with populations fewer than 100,000, which is essentially Kauai. The County of Kauai has put forward this bill every year for at least the past 5 years. Every year it gets defeated. By narrowing the scope to just that county, perhaps they think it will have a better chance. RBOAA is opposing the bill

SB704 – passed to the second round of committees
This bill proposes to set up a committee to study transient accommodations in the State and provides for membership from vacation rental owners.

HB1586 – First hearing scheduled for next week
The preamble to the bill proposes moving the tax burden from residents to non-residents. The bill, as currently drafted, doesn’t actually change the tax structure to affect non-residents. We will continue to watch this bill as it is likely to get amended by committee.

HB1453 / SB1143 – neither version has been heard by committee
This is another tax on tourists, this one being $20 per guest to fund environmental protection and conservation. The wording indicates that a party of 4 would pay $80.

SB702 – not yet heard by committee
This bill has already garnered some media attention as it states that failure to register for TAT and GET is a class C felony. A Class C felony is punishable by a maximum of seven years in prison. Class C felonies include crimes such as theft, possession of a controlled substance, second-degree statutory rape and first-degree involuntary manslaughter.

This bill also sets up a public database whereby anyone can look you up to see if you are properly registered. This raises certain security and privacy concerns.

SB695 – not yet heard by committee
This bill is actually quite good as it attempts to clarify that TAT applies to rent and mandatory fees charged to guests. RBOAA supports clarification of tax rules.

The Hawaii Legislature opened earlier in January and will run until about mid-May.

2. Funding and Membership – RBOAA

It is, of course, membership renewal time!

“Mahalo” to all of you who renewed your membership and/or made a donation to RBOAA this year. We would not be able to do what we do without your support.

We have engaged our lobbyist in Honolulu already this year and he has been of great help so far. But, he is not cheap!

In a recent study of some of the more popular owner rental web sites, there appears to be more than five thousand owner-managed vacation rental properties in Hawaii. That number dwarfs our membership numbers so we know there are a lot of owners out there who might not be aware of RBOAA, not aware of all the good work we have done, and all of the good we will continue to do on your behalf.

We need to grow our membership in order to continue on as we have in the past. Please ask anyone you know who owns a vacation rental property to visit our web site www.rboaa.org and become a member or make a donation today. We all have neighbors, friends, or maybe even family who would benefit. Please don’t assume they are aware of RBOAA. We are all in this together and all of you can act as a small army of recruiters. Please do your part and help us spread the word.

Help us make sure everyone who self manages a vacation rental property in Hawaii is aware of the opposition we all face and that RBOAA is here to help.

So please, right now, please renew your membership at www.rboaa.org and/or click on the “Donate — Click Here” button.

Remember, none of your executive team is paid – we are all volunteers.

3. Act 204 Took Effect January 1, 2016. Make sure you are in compliance today.

The full details of Act 204 are available on our website at www.rboaa.org. The key summary points are:

• If you don’t live on the same island as your vacation rental, you need to name a Local Contact and you must identify your Local Contact by name, phone number and email address to your guests before they check in and within the rental property. Your local contact does not need to be a real estate agent unless he/she is performing tasks for which a real estate license is required (e.g. collecting rent on your behalf).

• You must post your Hawaii Tax ID number (your TAT ID number) conspicuously in all advertisements and in your rental

We are still – yes – still – waiting for the detailed rules from the DoT as to how they will enforce and interpret Act 204. We will send that along to you when we get it.

4. Specific Regulations for each County

RBOAA’s mandate is focused at the State of Hawaii level, and to consider certain issues which bridge the County level and the State level.It is very important for you to know that each county in Hawaii has its own regulations (or lack thereof) for zoning and permitting of vacation rentals. Please visit the County Regulations page on the RBOAA website, https://www.rboaa.org/county-regulations/ to check for regulations and upcoming potential regulations. The onus is on you, as owner, to ensure you are in compliance with all regulations – state, county and HOA.

We recently updated the page with information on all counties.

We will do our best to keep this page up to date, but we can’t promise it is always up to date. If you have specific questions about county regulations which you can’t answer from our website, please contact the county. RBOAA simply does not have the volunteer resources to answer questions on specific county regulations.

Mahalo,

Nea

January 2017 Newsletter

January 31, 2017 Hawaii Rentals Comments Off on January 2017 Newsletter

Aloha! 

Happy New Year to Everyone!!
In this edition:
  1. 1) 2017 Legislative Session is open;
  2. 2) New Regulations Effective January 1, 2016;
  3. 3) Specific regulations for each County;
  4. 4) Update on Oahu County Enforcement; and
  5. 5) Funding and Membership Drive

The 2017 Legislative Session in now Open.

The Hawaii Legislature opened earlier in January and will run until about mid-May.   To understand the 2017 session, we need to remember last year.  The 2016 session ended with Governor Ige vetoing the bill which would allow the advertising platforms to collect and remit taxes on behalf of the operators.    As you know, one of the main criticisms of vacation rentals, whether true or not, is that we do not collect and remit taxes.  The hotel industry uses that argument across the nation to support increased regulation of vacation rentals.  The bill had put forward in an attempt to crack down on tax cheats.  During the session, the bill took on additional burdens – namely the requirement for advertising platforms to ensure owners complied with county zoning regulations.  Read More

Archive: Hawaii Department of Taxation Modernization

July 4, 2016 Hawaii Rentals Comments Off on Archive: Hawaii Department of Taxation Modernization

According to announcements made by the Hawaii DOT on May 5, 2016:

Modernization of the Tax System

“The Department is undergoing a major modernization effort to transform its operations and meet the rising expectations of today’s taxpayers. The Tax System Modernization Program is a collection of projects slated for completion by 2020. Almost every technical system used by the Department will be upgraded or replaced, especially old systems that no longer meet Hawaii’s needs. While the process of putting in new technology might lead to temporary performance hits, new tax systems will ultimately result in better taxpayer service and improved enforcement of tax laws.” Read More

Archive: June 2016 Newsletter

July 4, 2016 Hawaii Rentals Comments Off on Archive: June 2016 Newsletter

Aloha!

In this edition:

  1. Governor Ige Vetoes HB 1850
  2. New Regulations Effective January 1, 2016
  3. Specific regulations for each County
  4. Funding and Membership Drive

 


  1.    Governor Ige Vetoes HB 1850

This bill was put forward by AirBnB and the State of Hawaii Department of Tax in an attempt to crack down on tax cheats by allowing advertising platforms to collect and remit taxes directly to the State.   As you know, one of the main criticisms of vacation rentals, whether true or not, is that we do not collect and remit taxes.  The hotel industry uses that argument across the nation to support increased regulation of vacation rentals.   RBOAA initially supported this bill in order to quiet that accusation, but right from the very beginning, we had concerns about the level of confidentiality the advertising platforms were allowed to afford their owner/advertisers.  While we supported the bill, we asked for the veil of secrecy to be lifted.  The legislators did not agree and so, in later rounds of hearings on this bill, RBOAA opposed the measure.

During the legislative process, the bill took on additional burdens – namely the requirement for advertising platforms to ensure owners complied with county zoning regulations.  While RBOAA fully agrees that owners need to comply with County zoning, it is absurd to ask a third party for-profit organization to enforce the law.  Not only have the counties been largely unwilling or unable to enforce their own laws, RBOAA has long opposed any non-governmental authority being put into a regulatory authority role – most notably, property managers and real estate agents.

Ultimately, while the legislators did not heed RBOAA’s concerns, the Governor did, and this week, he announced he would veto the bill, saying that more work needed to be done to ensure county regulations were complied with, in addition to ensuring taxes were collected.  He also stated that transient vacation rentals are the responsibility of the counties.  This last statement is disturbing as the counties are generally very opposed to vacation rentals.  For example, The City and County of Honolulu has not issued a vacation rental permit for almost 30 years and, for example, in Maui new rules require an owner of a property with a value of less than $1 million to have owned the property for 5 years before turning into a vacation rental.

Looking forward, we will need to address issues not only at the state level but also at each of the counties.  This will make our work much harder in the coming years –  much harder unfortunately as we don’t have experience or resources at those levels of government.   One last note.  This bill attracted lots of passionate correspondence, in the RBOAA email inbox, in the media and letters to the editor, in social media and in the testimony to the legislators.  For many, this bill became a referendum on vacation rentals as a whole, with the argument being that we should not be allowed to rent out our properties to tourists at all.  Various property owners (especially in high value neighborhoods), social welfare groups, unions and even some RBOAA members took this position.  Some other RBOAA members opposed the bill because of a hate-on for AirBnB (even though no one ever explained the origin of that anger).  While everyone is entitled to their opinion and has the right to express it, there were some pretty vile emails in the RBOAA inbox.


2.    Act 204 Took Effect January 1, 2016.  Make sure you are in compliance today.

The full details of Act 204 are available on our website.  The key summary points are:

  • If you don’t live on the same island as your vacation rental, you need to name a Local Contact and you must identify your Local Contact by name, phone number and email address to your guests before they check in and within the rental property.  Your local contact does not need to be a real estate agent unless he/she is performing tasks for which a real estate license is required (e.g. collecting rent on your behalf).

You must post your Hawaii Tax ID number (your TAT ID number) conspicuously in all advertisements and in your rental

We are still waiting for the detailed rules from the DoT as to how they will enforce and interpret Act 204.  We will send that along to you when we get it.


   3.    Specific Regulations for each County

RBOAA’s mandate is focused at the State of Hawaii level, and to consider certain issues which bridge the County level and the State level.  Given the Governor’s comments, your executive committee will be discussing if and how we can be active at the County level, but it is very important for you to know that each county in Hawaii has its own regulations (or lack thereof) for zoning and permitting of vacation rentals.  For up to date information, please visit the County Regulations page on the RBOAA website, https://www.rboaa.org/county-regulations/ to check for regulations and upcoming potential regulations.

The onus is on you, as owner, to ensure you are in compliance with all regulations – state, county and HOA. On the County Regulations page is a listing of the rules for each of the counties along with the links to find each county’s regulations regarding Transient Vacation Rentals.  We will do our best to keep this page up to date, but it is advisable for you visit the planning department and planning commission web pages for each county to keep up to date with potential new rules and regulations that are in the works.  If you have specific questions about county regulations which you can’t answer from our website, please contact the county.  RBOAA simply does not have the volunteer resources to answer questions on specific county regulations.  Remember all counties have different property tax rates if you are renting out your property.   


    4.    Funding and Membership – RBOAA

We have worked with our lobbyists to contain the fees this year and we spent far less money this year than we did last year.    “Mahalo” to all of you who renewed your membership and/or made a donation to RBOAA this year.  We would not be able to do what we do without your support.

In a recent study of some of the more popular owner rental web sites, there appears to be more than five thousand owner-managed vacation rental properties in Hawaii.  That number dwarfs our membership numbers so we know there are a lot of owners out there who might not be aware of RBOAA, not aware of all the good work we have done, and all of the good we will continue to do on your behalf.   We need to grow our membership in order to continue on as we have in the past.  Please ask anyone you know who owns a vacation rental property to visit our web site www.rboaa.org and become a member or make a donation today.  We all have neighbors, friends, or maybe even family who would benefit.  Please don’t assume they are aware of RBOAA.  We are all in this together and all of you can act as a small army of recruiters.  Please do your part and help us spread the word.     Help us make sure everyone who self manages a vacation rental property in Hawaii is aware of the opposition we all face and that RBOAA is here to help.     So please, right now, please renew your membership at www.rboaa.org and click on the “Donate — Click Here” button.   Remember, none of your executive committee members are paid – we are all volunteers.

Thank you for your continued support. 

Mahalo, Neal www.rboaa.org info@rboaa.org Read More

Archive: Legislative Update: February 2016

February 17, 2016 Hawaii Rentals 0

Aloha from the President of RBOAA. 

The legislative session has completed the first two weeks of the session and a lot of dust has settled, and so I wanted to provide you with an update   In this edition: 

  1. New Regulations Effective January 1, 2016. 
  2. Proposed Bills as at January 31, 2016. 
  3. RBOAA Funding and Membership Drive. 

—————-

1.  Act 204 Took Effect January 1, 2016.  Make sure you are in compliance today. We know that the media is checking and some of you are not in compliance!

The full details of Act 204 are available on this website.

  • If you don’t live on the same island as your vacation rental, you need to name a Local Contact and you must identify your Local Contact by name, phone number and email address to your guests before they check in and within the rental property
  • You must post your Hawaii Tax ID number (your TAT ID number) conspicuously in all advertisements and in your rental

If you have any questions, RBOAA recommends you contact the Hawaii Department of Taxation.  The DoT will shortly be issuing some information about how they are going to administer the new rules and I will send that along to you when I get it. Read More

Archive: Year End Update: December 2015 Newsletter

December 15, 2015 Hawaii Rentals Comments Off on Archive: Year End Update: December 2015 Newsletter

 

Aloha and Mele Kalikimaka!

We had a challenging and ultimately successful 2015, made possible through efforts of members and your Executive Committee, and it’s time to get ready for what lies ahead in 2016.

Most notably, new rules affecting our vacation rentals take effect on January 1, 2016. Please see Section 3 below to ensure you are ready.

While the future offers uncertainty, one thing is for sure: Without you, our members, we would not be in the position we’re all in today — still able to operate our legal vacation rentals in the State of Hawaii. You keep us going, and it’s your contributions, past and future, that anchor this update.

A hearty ‘mahalo’ from me and from all of your Executive and volunteers. Please keep up your volunteer support as well as, and especially, your financial support, for RBOAA —it keeps us all going!

Neal

 

In this newsletter edition, we cover a lot of territory!

  1. Upcoming Legislative Session
  2. Funding and Membership
  3. New Regulations Effective January 1, 2016
  4. 2016 RBOAA Executive Committee
  5. Ocean Safety
  6. Next Steps

Read More

Archive: Act 204 at-a-glance

July 17, 2015 legislation Comments Off on Archive: Act 204 at-a-glance

Update on the 2015 Hawaii Legislative Session

In January, we faced almost a dozen bills which could have impacted our transient vacation rentals.  In the end, only one survived.  SB519 became Act 204 and is discussed below.

SB519 SD2 HD3 CD1 (“SB519”) is now Act 204

On July 2, Governor Ige signed SB519 into law and is now known as Act 204.  Generally, this bill covers Local Contacts, Advertising and Tax Compliance for Transient Rentals.  The latest version of the bill was posted on the legislative website Saturday, May 2, and can be accessed through this link:  SB519 CD1.htm

This is a very good outcome for RBOAA members and all those who own or own and operate rental accommodations in Hawaii. There is no doubt that we would be in a very different place, and a very disadvantageous place, had it not been for all the efforts of the RBOAA membership.  We banded together and made strong, passionate and logical arguments to the Legislators.

Please note that this bill replaces Act 326 which ceases to have force on December 31, 2015.  SB519/Act 204 negates the need to extend Act 326 as certain key provisions of Act 326 are carried forward indefinitely within the Transient Accommodations Tax Act.

 

Act 204 at-a-glance:

  • If you don’t live on the same island as your vacation rental, you need to name a Local Contact.  The Local Contact is a person or a company resident on the island (when companies are local contacts they must have someone who resides on the island).  The Local Contact is not necessarily a real estate agent and is not necessarily an employee of the owner.

  • You must post your Hawaii Tax ID (your TAT ID number) number conspicuously in all advertisements and in your rental (note: we have always had to post our GET number in our rental);

  • You must identify your local contact by name, phone number and email address to your guests before they check in and within the rental property;

  • There is no longer any requirement for the HOA to collect and remit tax ID and local contact information annually;

  • Your online advertising system, i.e., VRBO, FlipKey, AirBnB, must ensure you have posted your Hawaii Tax ID (your TAT ID number) in your advertisement;

  • The same rules now apply to time shares and homes as to other transient accommodations; and,

  • The fines for non-compliance are very steep and include a monetary fine and a prohibition against operation.

What do you need to do?

  • Make sure that your Hawaii tax identification number (your TAT number) is posted on all of your websites and advertisements. (Hint: check that it is still there.  Sometimes your advertiser updates their site and information is lost)

  • Make sure your Hawaii tax identification (both TAT & GET) certificates are posted conspicuously in your rental.  If you have lost your certificates, contact the Department of Taxation for a replacement copy.

  • Make sure your local contact’s name, email and phone number are posted conspicuously in your rental and that this information is sent to your guests before they arrive.

Failure to comply with any of these could result in heavy fines and a cease and desist order.   We have every reason to believe that the DoT is getting ready to very actively enforce these rules this year.


MORE DETAILS of ACT 204:

  • This Act shall take effect on January 1, 2016.

  • The preamble sees the legislature declare, per Section 521-43(f) of the Hawaii Revised Statutes, (the Landlord Tenant Code) that as a consumer-protection measure, an owner who lives out of state or on a different island than the rental unit shall designate an agent who resides on the same island to act on the owner’s behalf.  The preamble explains that designating a “local contact” is essential in the case of an emergency or natural disaster, and for dealing with any questions, concerns, or property issues that might arise regarding the transient accommodation.

  • The bill amends section 237D-1 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes (the Transient Accommodation Tax Act) to add a new definition — “Local Contact” — which it defines as:  ““Local contact” means an individual residing on the same island as the transient accommodation or resort time share vacation unit or an entity with a place of business and at least one employee, officer, partner, member, or other person working on behalf of the company who is residing on the same island as the transient accommodation or resort time share vacation unit.”

  • The bill amends section 237D-1 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes to add a new definition — “Transient Accommodations Broker” — which it defines as:  “Transient accommodations broker” means any person or entity, including but not limited to persons who operate online websites, online travel agencies, or online booking agencies, that offers, lists, advertises, or accepts reservations or collects whole or partial payment for transient accommodations or resort time share vacation interests, units, or plans.”

  • The bill amends the definition of “transient accommodations” in section 237D-1 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes to include single family dwelling and dwelling unit (Chapter 514B), so as to affirm that when such defined spaces are used for less than 180 consecutive days by a transient, the spaces are “transient accommodations” and fall subject to compliance with applicable statutes.

  • The bill amends section 237D-4 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes relating to the display of the Hawaii Tax ID, i.e., the “Certificate of Registration,” (your TAT number) adding that, “The name, phone number, and electronic mail address of the local contact shall at all times be conspicuously displayed in the same place as the registration or the same place as the notice stating where the registration may be inspected and examined.  Failure to meet the requirements of this subsection shall be unlawful.”  [Note: RBOAA recommends that the information be displayed in the rental property.]

  • The bill amends section 237D-4 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes to advise that, “The department [Department of Taxation] may issue citations to any person who fails to conspicuously display the registration or notice, or the local contact’s name, phone number, or electronic mail address as required.  A citation issued pursuant to this subsection for each transient accommodation or resort time share vacation interest, plan, or unit in violation of this subsection shall include a monetary fine of not less than:  (1)  $500 per day, for a first violation for which a citation is issued; (2)  $1,000 per day, for a second violation for which a citation is issued; and, (3)  $5,000 per day, for a third and any subsequent violation for which a citation is issued.  Any monetary fine assessed under this section shall be due and payable thirty days after issuance of the citation, subject to appeal rights provided under this subsection.  Citations may be appealed to the director of taxation or the director’s designee.”

  • The bill amends section 237D-4 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes relating to the advertisements for transient accommodations, to advise that “Any advertisement, including an online advertisement, for any transient accommodation or resort time share vacation interest, plan, or unit shall conspicuously provide:  (1)  The registration identification number (your TAT number) or an electronic link to the registration identification number of the operator or plan manager issued pursuant to this section; and, (2) The local contact’s name, phone number, and electronic mail address, provided that this paragraph shall be considered satisfied if this information is provided to the transient or occupant prior to the furnishing of the transient accommodation or resort time share vacation unit.  Failure to meet the requirements shall be unlawful.” [Note:  RBOAA recommends that owner operators include the Tax ID in every advertisement.]

  • The bill amends section 237D-4 to advise that, “The department [Department of Taxation] may issue citations to any person, including operators, plan managers, and transient accommodations brokers, who violates [the ‘advertisement’] subsection.  The penalties are the same as for operators, as noted above.

 If you have any questions, we recommend you contact the Hawaii Department of Taxation.

Archive: Email Sent to All Hawaiian Senators and Representatives

March 23, 2015 legislation Comments Off on Archive: Email Sent to All Hawaiian Senators and Representatives

The following is an email sent to all Hawaiian Senators and Representatives offering to work together to resolve the challenges posed by TVR and the unsubstantiated claims being made:

 

Dear Hawaii Senators and State Representatives:

 

I’m writing to you in the hope that we might work together to put in place a consistent, effective approach to the state’s array of accommodation offerings including owner-operated transient accommodations and agency-managed transient accommodations.

 

This legislative session — and the four legislative sessions prior — have witnessed a number of bills introduced that offer widely disparate statements as to the definition, quantity, and legality of these types of transient accommodations. Whether the description is Individual Visitor Units (IVUs), Individually Advertised Units (IAUs), Transient Vacation Rentals (TVRs), or Transient Vacation Units (TVUs), we do not believe that Hawaii wishes to put an end to this type of accommodation, nor do we believe Hawaii wants to send a message that such options are to be denied to consumers. But the attacks on this popular vacation option has seen Hawaii legislators criticized for advancing bills that create monopolies for hotels or property managers.

 

We think this annual legislative ritual is unfair to everyone involved, including the legislature and the Hawaii Department of Taxation. It undermines the image of the legislature when it is used by special-interest groups to further their interests at the expense of others. It’s time all stakeholders started working together to identify the real issues that affect Hawaii. We all need to understand the problems and their causes and identify solutions to improve the entire State, rather than proposing bills intended to aid one stakeholder at the expense of others. Such solutions should adhere to the underlying principles of our State and country.

 

From the bills that have been introduced this session, we make four observations:

 

First, Hawaii hoteliers want to deny consumer access to vacation condos and homes, and restrict the free market.

 

Second, Hawaii condo-rental agencies want to deny consumers’ ability and preference to book directly with the owner. The Internet has dramatically impacted a business model set in the 1980s.

 

Third, unscrupulous individuals, recognizing that state agencies have not been enforcing current law, are not complying with vacation-rental and tax requirements. We cannot attempt to address this problem by punishing those who are compliant with current law by stripping them of their opportunities and freedoms. It doesn’t matter where the property owner resides, the property is in Hawaii and therefore the existing laws of the state that admirably uphold constitutional and trade-agreement provisions must be enforced.

 

Fourth, Hawaii residents would like their neighborhoods to be places where they can expect enjoyment of their free time. They’d like their communities, and those of their friends and families, to have the services and support that make them good places to live, work, and explore. Owners of legal vacation-rental properties share these values, but we recognize there are some owners who do not. Rather than penalize all, we need to identify and address the owners who do not operate within their social license.

 

Owners of legal Hawaii vacation rental property contribute to the state’s ability to offer the accommodation choices of any globally significant tourist destination in the competitive tourism marketplace. We would appreciate an end to the special-interest lobby-based bills that arise each year. Such bills harm what Hawaii stands for and threatens its economic future.

 

So, we’re suggesting something that has been sorely missing in all the bills advanced in this and previous sessions on transient accommodations: Let’s work together. Let’s work together to identify issues. Let’s work together to generate valid and reliable data. And let’s work together to enable informed and effective policy development.

 

Let’s put a stop to those who try to use the Hawaii State Legislature to serve the wants of the few at the expense of all. This is in no one’s best interest and compromises the state.

 

We offer to work with you and any who seek to demonstrate the better nature of Hawaii. Too much time and energy have been spent on divisive tactics that only seek to tear down what honest property owners have built. It’s time for us all to work together.

 

We look forward to receiving your individual and collective support for this offer.

 

Sincerely,

Archive: State of Hawaii Answers Property Owners’ Questions

January 28, 2014 tax Comments Off on Archive: State of Hawaii Answers Property Owners’ Questions

dcca

Regulated Industries Complaints Office

State of Hawaii

 

In Hawaii, it’s your choice whether you manage your vacation rental yourself or hire a property manager.  There are important requirements in vacation rental management, and the State of Hawaii Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs has provided information to assist property owners who rent or lease property in Hawaii.  The following Question and Answer information (Q&A) is drawn from this helpful Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs resource and expanded upon to provide further clarification – click here.

 

When is a real estate license required?

In the State of Hawaii, a real estate license is required to sell, buy, lease, and manage real property.

 

Can a property owner manage his/her own property without a license?

Yes. A property owner can sell, buy, lease, and manage his/her own property without a real estate license, regardless of the owner’s place of residence.

 

Can a property owner hire a custodian or caretaker to manage their property?

Yes. A property owner can hire a custodian or caretaker to manage or care for his/her property. The “custodian” or “caretaker” doesn’t need a real estate license so long as he/she is employed by the owner. The exemption is limited to managing property for one owner. There is a deemed employer-employee relationship between the owner and the custodian / caretaker.


Must a property owner comply with Hawaii’s Residential Landlord-Tenant Code?

Yes. A property owner who rents or leases their own property must comply with Hawaii’s Residential Landlord-Tenant Code. Among other things, the Code requires owners and landlords who reside outside of the state or on another island to designate an on-island agent to act on the owner’s behalf. The designated on-island agent must be licensed if engaging in any activity for which a real estate license is required.

 

Must a property owner comply with state and county tax laws?

Yes. A property owner must comply with applicable state and county tax laws. State tax law requires persons who operate transient accommodations to designate a local contact or agent who resides on-island, in case of an emergency or natural disaster, or to answer any questions, concerns, or property issues that arise about the transient accommodation. The on-island local contact or agent must be licensed if engaging in any activity for which a real estate license is required.

 

 _________________________________________

 

 

For questions about when a real estate license may be required, contact the Hawaii Real Estate Commission’s Real Estate Branch at: (808) 586-2645.

To report unlicensed real estate activity, call the Regulated Industries Complains Office’s Consumer Resource Center at (808) 587-4272. To check licensing status or for information about hiring a licensed professional, call or visit the RICO website at cca.hawaii.gov/rico.

To obtain a copy of the Office of Consumer Protection’s Handbook for the Hawaii Residential Landlord-Tenant Code, contact the Office of Consumer Protection at (808) 586-2634 or download it online. This informative guide covers rental agreements, security deposits, repairs, prohibited practices, termination of tenancy, landlord obligations, tenant obligations, and remedies.


 

 

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Archive: FAQ — Hawaiian & Federal Taxes

January 27, 2014 tax Comments Off on Archive: FAQ — Hawaiian & Federal Taxes

hotel-pool

Hawaii State Tax

 

What Hawaii taxes must be collected from guests and remitted to the State?

  • General Excise Tax.  This is a tax assessed on all business activities.  It is 4.5% on Oahu and 4% on all other islands.  For more information: http://tax.hawaii.gov/faq/#get
  • Transient Accommodations Tax.  The TAT is imposed on gross rental income derived from renting transient accommodations in Hawaii. It is 9.25% for most rentals, 7.25% for time shares. For more information (note: the rates in this link are outdated): http://files.hawaii.gov/tax/legal/taxfacts/tf96-02.htm

 

What Hawaii forms do I need to file?

  • File your Hawaii non-resident N-15 State Tax Return.
  • File GE-45 taxes quarterly or monthly as well as your Annual GE-49 form.  This is required by both Act 326 (which expires on December 31, 2015) and Act 204 (which takes force on January 1, 2016) [download document].
  • File TA-1 taxes quarterly or monthly. This is required by both Act 326 (which expires on December 31, 2015) and Act 204 (which takes force on January 1, 2016).  [download document]
.
  • File your Annual TA-2 form. This is required by both Act 326 (which expires on December 31, 2015) and Act 204 (which takes force on January 1, 2016). [download document]
.

To access these forms and their instructions visit the State of Hawaii Department of Taxation page providing the “Alphabetical list of Hawaii Forms and Publications” [view site].

 

What other requirements arise from the Hawaii Department of Tax?


Act 204, effective  January 1, 2016, continues the following requirements of Act 326.

Operators of transient accommodations are required to do the following, for which there are steep penalties for failure to comply, including the possibility of being found guilty of a misdemeanor:

  • Designate a local contact residing on the same island as the transient
accommodation.
  • Include the local contact’s name and phone number in any contract or written rental agreement and post clearly in the vacation rental property.
  • Include the TAT registration identification number (also called the TAT license number) on all websites and advertisements.  Please note that for some taxpayers the TAT license number may contain a different suffix from the taxpayer’s GET license number, so make sure you post the TAT number.

 

When do I file my GE (General Excise) and TA (Transient Accommodations) taxes?

This depends on how much rental income you collect. Please see the Hawaii Department of Taxation outline on how to determine the measure and rate of taxes due. Includes when reports of taxes due are to be filed. [download document]

 

Who must file an N-15
?

As a nonresident or part-year resident of the State of Hawaii, the taxpayer is required to file a Hawaii income tax return if any of the following apply:

  • The taxpayer or spouse is doing business in Hawaii during the taxable year regardless of whether the taxpayer or spouse derives any taxable income from that business. “Doing business” includes all activities engaged in or caused to be engaged in with the object of gain or economic benefit, direct or indirect, except personal services performed as an employee under the direction and control of an employer. Example: Every person receiving rents from property owned in Hawaii is “doing business” and must file a return whether or not the person’s expenses exceed the gross rental income.

 

Who do I contact in Hawaii to get registered to pay taxes?

You can register by going to the following website and follow the Wizard for step-by-step instructions hbe.ehawaii.gov

 

Federal Tax

Where do I find information on the rental of residential real property?

Please refer to the Hawaii Department of Taxation document “Information on the Rental of Residential Real Property” available for download at [download document].

 

What is a 1099 — MISC
?

Form 1099-MISC is used to report certain types of payments made in the course of a trade or business. If you’re in business or self-employed, you may need to submit this report to both the Internal Revenue Service and the person or business whom you paid.

 

When is Form 1099-MISC required?

Businesses will need to fill out a Form 1099-MISC for persons, vendors, subcontractors, independent contractors, and others to whom $600 or more per year is paid for services (including parts and materials). Reporting such payments is required if the recipient of the payment is not a corporation — for example, when the recipient is an individual, partnership, a limited liability company treated as a partnership or sole proprietorship. Payments made to corporations are required in the case of legal fees paid to attorneys.

 

 

 

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